Chair: Scott Mounce – scottmounce@gmail.com

Members: John Doyle

 

Baldwin

Baldwin is a town in Cumberland County, Maine, United States. The population was 1,525 at the 2010 census.

First called Flintstown Plantation, it was granted in 1774 by the Massachusetts General Court to survivors of the Concord, Massachusetts, company commanded by Captain John Flint. It replaced a grant of about 1735 which gave them Township No. 3, because when state borders were adjusted in 1741, the town turned out to be in New Hampshire—present-day Walpole. On June 23, 1802, Flintstown was incorporated as Baldwin, named for Colonel Loammi Baldwin, for whom the Baldwin apple was named. Sebago was set off and incorporated in 1826.

The surface of the town is broken, but with soil favorable to grain and hay. Baldwin would be noted for its orchards, and a factory was established in East Baldwin for drying apples. There was also a corn factory. Brooks provided water power for various mills which produced board lumber, barrel staves and shooks. During times of drought, the Saco Water Power Company could regulate water at Great Falls to run mills down the Saco River in Saco and in Biddeford. The Portland and Ogdensburg Railroad followed the Saco River valley for the length of Baldwin.